The Weekly Resolve Email 45 – Avoid Your Biases

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Helping You Make Better Decisions

Hey, Darren here.

You’re receiving this email because you signed up to The Weekly Resolve, a weekly email about making better decisions. Thank you for being here. If you enjoy the email, please forward it to a lucky friend. And if this email was forwarded to you, get your own.📩


Do you write down your decisions?

It’s a question I suspect most of us answer negatively. Until recently, the biggest determining factor regarding the quality of my life came from outcomes and my memory. No journal, no diary — just my mind recalling outcomes I either liked or disliked.

Of course, memories hold no bias, do they?

The biases of recency, outcome and hindsight would certainly blight my view of past events. How often were great outcomes more to do with luck than my brilliant decision-making?

I’m too biased to answer.

In truth, we all are. This is why I ask if you write down your decisions. I’m not talking about capturing your t-shirt selection dilemma, or your decision to hit the snooze button. No, I’m talking about the decisions that matter. The choices you have to make that might change your income, impact where you live — and who you live with. These are the so-called big decisions.

I’ve given you a nudge as to why you should write down your decisions, but maybe you’re not convinced…


Quote

Do you collect quotes?

I do, so here is one I’m pondering.*

“Incredible change happens in your life when you decide to take control of what you do have power over instead of craving control over what you don’t.” —Steve Maraboli

*Interestingly, I wanted to use an alternative word instead of pondering, but I was struck by the definition from Merriam-webster.

“Some common synonyms of ponder are meditate, muse, and ruminate. While all these words mean “to consider or examine attentively or deliberately,” ponder implies a careful weighing of a problem or, often, prolonged inconclusive thinking about a matter.”


New for you

Where Will This Decision Take Us?: It is a critical thinking question that pushes us to consider the consequences of the decision we face. Read the full article here.


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Keep on making great decisions!

Darren Matthews

Founder, The Resolve Blog

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Make Better Decisions

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